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Indications
ENBREL is indicated for reducing signs and symptoms, inducing major clinical response, inhibiting the progression of structural damage, and improving physical function in patients with moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis. ENBREL can be initiated in combination with methotrexate (MTX) or used alone. Read more

ENBREL is indicated for the treatment of patients 4 years or older with chronic moderate to severe plaque psoriasis (PsO) who are candidates for systemic therapy or phototherapy.

ENBREL is indicated for reducing signs and symptoms, inhibiting the progression of structural damage of active arthritis, and improving physical function in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). ENBREL can be used with or without MTX.

ENBREL is indicated for reducing signs and symptoms in patients with active ankylosing spondylitis.

ENBREL is indicated for reducing signs and symptoms of moderately to severely active polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis in patients ages 2 and older. Close

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A button is just something you press to get a task done. Or is it? Buttons do just about everything, which is why they come in an almost endless variety of shapes and sizes, each tailor-made for the task at hand. We wanted to take a closer look at what makes a button work best so we could design one that acknowledges the very specific needs of patients with rheumatoid arthritis or psoriatic arthritis.

See what we discovered

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Our lab Building a Better Button

Building a better button

Think about the buttons you interact with every day.

From coffee machines to the buttons on a remote control—even the keys on your computer—buttons are tailored to their task in terms of shape, placement, and ease of use.

Some buttons are intentionally designed to require more effort than others, such as those activating potentially dangerous machinery. But buttons we use every day, like an elevator call button, are usually designed to be as simple to use as possible.

Elevator animation
We interact with buttons every day

Buttons are usually designed to be as simple to use as possible

Task-driven functionality

Buttons are designed to take what the user is doing into account.

They include mechanisms that make for a better end-to-end user experience to carefully align function with the user's intent and mitigate the associated risk of inadvertently pushing the button.

For instance, if you want to force shutdown your computer, you'll need to press not one but three buttons—Control, Alt, Delete. In a similar fashion, it may only take the press of a button to start your car, but in many cases, you'll have to hold the brake pedal down simultaneously to make sure you don’t suddenly accelerate into traffic or a garage door.

Car ignition animation
Starting a car’s ignition often requires a simultaneous foot on the brake

Buttons are often designed to align function with the user’s intent

Form factor: shape, size, and materials

Many factors influence a button’s shape.

You may have noticed that certain buttons feel like second nature to operate, like the buttons on a computer mouse. While not particularly large or obtrusive, the shape, placement, and ease of clicking mean the user often doesn’t need to look at the buttons to know how they function, relying instead on their sense of touch and intuition.

Button animation

Other buttons are made to be extremely large, allowing them to be pressed from a variety of angles. For example, a button to open a hospital door is very large and requires low push accuracy so that you can even press it with an elbow if you’re in a wheelchair or using crutches. A button’s use also dictates the material used in its construction. These can range from soft plastics for light usage to metal that allows the button to withstand heavy use or exposure to the elements.

Button animation

Location, location, location

Where a button is placed can say a lot about a button’s intended use.

It’s not surprising that buttons are often placed where they can most easily be used. Take arcade games for instance. There’s a good reason buttons are placed on top of a joystick and on the sides of a pinball machine. It’s a location comfortable to the hand and suited for the task. Similarly, monitor buttons are often placed along the bottom where interacting with them does not block the screen.

Joystick animation Pinball machine animation Computer animation
Top placement Side placement Base placement

Under pressure

Some buttons are easier to press than others.

While some buttons intended for repeated use are made to be easy to press, others can require more force to activate.

Computer key, Crosswalk button

keyboard key takes 13 newtons

a crosswalk button takes about 22 newtons

See how many newtons are needed to activate each device

Patients should be trained by a healthcare professional prior to using Enbrel Mini® single-dose prefilled cartridge with AutoTouch® reusable autoinjector. This website is for informational purposes only. Detailed instructions are provided in the Instructions for Use. This site is intended for healthcare professionals only. If you are not a healthcare professional, please contact your doctor about ENBREL.

We wanted to create an injection device with an activation button specifically designed to meet the needs of RA and PsA patients

Enbrel Mini® with AutoTouch® start button

The button is placed at a slightly downward angle for easier accessibility.

Patient #1 Patient #2 Patient #3
ENBREL® (etanercept) logo
Enbrel Mini® single-dose prefilled cartridge with AutoTouch® reusable autoinjector
Positioning the button at the top allows one-handed injection where the button is triggered with the thumb.
A button on the side appeared to be challenging for users with larger hands.
A button at the base appeared to be less intuitive.
See how the button's angle took shape ▶
Hand gripping the Enbrel Mini® with AutoTouch®
Enbrel Mini® with AutoTouch® button and sensor
Enbrel Mini® with AutoTouch® button – A simple press and release of the button for activation
Computer key—13 newtons
Crosswalk button—22 newtons
Car start button

Like a car that requires the brake pedal be pushed to start it, Enbrel Mini® with AutoTouch® has a skin sensor to confirm the user’s intent

Dishwasher button
Elevator button

Like the buttons on an elevator or a dishwasher, AutoTouch® only requires a simple press and release of the button for activation

1 Ready to inject
2 Injection in progress
3 Injection complete
Female patient
Visual and audio indicators provide feedback throughout the injection process
Artboard 1

Gentle pressure

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Skin Sensor Confirmation

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Top Location

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Functional Shape

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Press and release

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Communicating key information

Artboard 1

Redundant Communications

A BUTTON BUILT FOR RA AND PsA

Enbrel Mini® single-dose prefilled cartridge with AutoTouch® reusable autoinjector automates the injection process with a press and release of a button.

Artboard 1

Gentle pressure

Cognizant of the needs of moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients, we set out to design an autoinjector with a button to help minimize the amount of force needed to activate it. A typical computer key takes approximately 13 newtons to activate while the Enbrel Mini® with AutoTouch® only takes a maximum of 5.56 newtons—that’s less than half the force of pressing a computer key! In fact, validation testing of 66 autoinjectors revealed that the actual amount of force needed was even lower, ranging from 1.7 to 2.9 newtons. And if you’re wondering if such a sensitive button could make misfires a problem, we thought of that too...

Artboard 1

Skin Sensor Confirmation

Because the button requires such little force to press, we equipped Enbrel Mini® with AutoTouch® with a mechanism to help prevent accidental injections: a skin sensor that doesn’t allow the injection to proceed unless it detects that the device is in proper contact with the skin.

Enbrel Mini® with AutoTouch® button and sensor
Car start button

Like a car that requires the brake pedal be pushed to start it, Enbrel Mini® with AutoTouch® has a skin sensor to confirm the user’s intent

Artboard 1

Top Location

Research revealed that a button placed on the side of the device was challenging for those with larger hands. Thus, the button was placed at an angle at the top, giving patients the ability to trigger the device with their thumb. In addition, the flange around the button was minimized, enabling better accessibility.

Positioning the button at the top allows one-handed injection where the button is triggered with the thumb.
A button on the side appeared to be challenging for users with larger hands.
A button at the base appeared to be less intuitive.
Artboard 1

Functional Shape

The button on the Enbrel Mini® with AutoTouch® is tapered to allow for activation while reducing the need for the user to adjust their grip on the device. Find out how patients are getting a handle on grip with AutoTouch®.

See how the button's angle took shape ▶
Hand gripping the Enbrel Mini® with AutoTouch®

OPERATING THE BUTTON

Besides its shape, placement, and the pressure required for activation, the button on the AutoTouch® was designed with other features to help patients successfully complete the injection process. See more features of AutoTouch® in action.

Artboard 1

Press and release

There are plenty of buttons that aren’t required to be continuously held down in order to function. Instead, the buttons we use every day, such as garage door openers, elevator buttons, and dishwasher buttons, require only a quick press and release.

In the same way, the button on the Enbrel Mini® with AutoTouch® does not need to be held down throughout the injection process. Instead, a simple press and release of the button begins the injection.

Enbrel Mini® with AutoTouch® button – A simple press and release of the button for activation
Dishwasher button
Elevator button

Like the buttons on an elevator or a dishwasher, AutoTouch® only requires a simple press and release of the button for activation

Artboard 1

Communicating key information

The button on the Enbrel Mini® with AutoTouch® also has several features that convey important information to the user throughout the injection process. Prior to the injection, a light in the button illuminates green, letting the user know that the device is ready to inject. During the injection, the light flashes, showing the user that the injection is in progress, and the green light stops when the injection is complete.

1 Ready to inject
2 Injection in progress
3 Injection complete
Artboard 1

Redundant Communications

In addition to the button light, Enbrel Mini® with AutoTouch® has redundant communication features, such as an LCD progress bar on the side and an audio chime when the injection is complete. That way, the user has multiple feedback mechanisms throughout the injection process.

Female patient
Visual and audio indicators provide feedback throughout the injection process

PURPOSE-BUILT FOR RA AND PsA PATIENTS

There's nothing simple about designing a simple button.

We thought about placement, shape, size, push pressure, and lighting so we could make a button suited for RA and PsA patients. Ultimately, the button on the AutoTouch® may seem inconsequential, yet it has a real-world impact on our RA and PsA patients—and that's what matters to us.

Patient #1 Patient #2 Patient #3

Get to know Enbrel Mini® single-dose prefilled cartridge with Autotouch® reusable autoinjector

Experience Enbrel Mini® with AutoTouch® in person and see how the simple press and release of a button can automate the injection process for your patients taking ENBREL.

Talk to your ENBREL representative or call 1-888-4ENBREL to schedule an in-person demo.

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